Extended Warranty

Important Information To Know About Extended Warranty Refunds

By November 7, 2019 No Comments

Like most goods and services, extended warranty policies come with the option of getting refunds.

However, extended warranties — especially automobile extended warranties — are unique entities, and as such, have unique characteristics about when and how refunds are available.

The purpose of this Obvi blog is to help spread some important details that consumers should know and remember about how these work.

First, let’s consider how buying warranty or insurance works. The losses of the few are paid by the many, which explains why no other kind of insurance product in Canada offers a refund — not home insurance, not life insurance, not car insurance.

So, why are many automobile extended warranties eligible for refunds? Truth be told, the deck is stacked in favour of the warranty provider — let’s look at why.

Exclusions and eligibility

As with any and all insurance policies, it’s always important to read the fine print for exclusions and eligibility. The last thing you want is to think you’re still covered, and make decisions based on that assumption, only to later discover that you were wrong.

For example: many vehicle warranty policies have kilometer caps for refund eligibility. Once a kilometer threshold has been crossed, there goes your chance at getting a refund.

Claims erase your right to a refund

This one might seem obvious, but some people still miss it. For most policies, any time you make a claim it waives your chance to collect a refund at a later date. Why? Because if an insurance company has already paid you money for a claim then your premium is considered to have been used up.

Check the timeframe limits

All policies with refund options have a timeframe where the request has to be made. For example, 60 days after the policy has expired. Some companies will offer you something back if you miss this deadline, but not the full refund amount that you would have been entitled to otherwise.

Pro rata cancellation

How much refund you’re entitled to often depends on how much of your policy has lapsed. For example: many insurance policies offer refunds on a “pro rata” basis. The website Insuranceopedia gives a good example of how this works:

“For example, a policyholder purchases a one-year policy for $1,000 but cancels it after six months. In a pro rate cancellation, they would receive a refund of $500, which is equivalent to the remaining six months of coverage they forfeited.”

You might have to commit to the car if you want a refund

According to a recent article by Autotrader, the average length of time a driver keeps a new vehicle is 71.4 months, or roughly six years.

This is important to remember, because many policies require you to  keep your vehicle — and keep it safe — for the full term in order to be eligible for a refund. That means no sales or transfers, nor can the vehicle be written off. These kinds of requirements are red flags, as it suggests the company isn’t actually serious about refunding premiums — they fully expect you to lose your eligibility before the date it can become active.

If you have further questions about how Obvi’s refunds work you can always contact the company to connect with an agent.